Date :Monday, November 5th, 2018 | Time : 09:28 |ID: 77047 | Print

Hate directed towards Islam has motivated many US Muslims to enter politics

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SHAFAQNA- Since the 2016 presidential election, Trump’s views expressed on the campaign trail and from the Oval Office have stoked the fire of Islamophobic rhetoric in the political mainstream, proliferating hate speech and anti-Muslim sentiment. In response to Trump‘s policies, and Hate directed towards Islam, many Muslims  in the United States has motivated to enter politics.

The New York Times in an article entitled as “The Muslims Are Coming” pointed that It’s the hate directed toward Islam that has motivated so many to enter the political arena.

In July, The Associated Press interviewed Muslim candidates about this record number. The reporting revealed that it’s precisely the bigotry and hate that has been directed toward Islam — including in remarks and tweets by President Trump — that has motivated so many Muslims to enter the political arena, where they now stand poised to advance policies that directly reflect their faith and also benefit all of their constituents.

These Muslim political veterans and upstarts certainly aren’t the first to demonstrate that deeply held religious beliefs can inspire a commitment to social justice.

Muslims are here, they’re running for office, and a few are going to Washington, where they’ll do something many members of Congress have failed to do for a long time: serve God by serving people.

Sometimes your enemy becomes the reason of your success

In reaction to this article, the President of Shia Muslim Council of Southern California, Dr S Mostafa Qazwini tweeted: The Muslims Are Coming via @nytimes . This is an important article. Sometimes your enemy becomes the reason of your success!

The upcoming midterm elections could affect Trump’s ability to govern

The upcoming midterm elections will most likely be one of the most consequential of the next generation, and the trajectory of life in the U.S, forbes told. The midterm elections are being held halfway through Trump’s presidential term, and the make-up of Congress’s two chambers could affect his ability to govern. The outcome of the midterms could reduce Trump’s powers or might work in his favour, Politico mentioned.

The November elections will see 35 of the 100 seats in the US Senate up for grabs. US voters will also choose all 435 members of the US House of Representatives, the lower chamber of Congress.

Final outcomes are difficult to predict, especially as early voting suggests turnout could be the highest it’s been in decades, according to Associated Press. But polls show that Americans’ anger at Trump may help Democrats gain more seats in Congress after the elections in November, Press TV reported .

Muslims make up about 1 percent of the U.S. population

Muslims make up about 1 percent of the U.S. population, which means that, unlike other minority groups, they do not have the numbers to influence election outcomes on a national level except at the margins. But they do have the numbers to make an impact at the local and state levels, newrepublic noticed. According to Talkmedia news, survey respondents believed Muslims represent 17 percent of the U.S. population, far higher than their actual 1.1 percent.

Detroit and its suburbs are home to one of the largest American Muslim communities in the U.S.

Nearly 100 Muslim political hopefuls have filed to run for elected office this year in America. Only a dozen or so had run in 2016, gulfnews mentioned. This election season has shown that Muslim-Americans are demanding more of the one party willing to give them a political home.

How do Muslim-Americans who voted for Trump then feel about him now?

In 2015, as a presidential candidate, Donald Trump called for “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States”. Despite the tough talk throughout the campaign, roughly 17 percent of American Muslims favored a Trump victory, npr reported.

So how do Muslim-Americans who voted for Trump then feel about him now, nearly two years since his administration introduced the controversial travel ban on several Muslim-majority countries?

Administration started with the Muslim ban but are not limited to it. Trump’s first year in office corresponded with a 15 percent increase in hate crimes against Muslims in the U.S. The Trump administration’s foreign policy in the Middle East has also not sat well with most Muslims, including the administration’s recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and its decision to open a U.S. embassy there.

Trump has also used and legitimized anti-Muslim rhetoric as a campaign strategy in the midterms. A new report published by the group Muslim Advocates found “80 separate instances of clear anti-Muslim political rhetoric being directly used by candidates in 2017 and 2018 races. A majority of the candidates using this rhetoric are Republican.

Trump also recently referred to a US-bound caravan of migrants as an “invasion” – making flimsy, unproved claims that “Middle Easterners” were among them, The guardian reported.

But Muslim-American political activity this campaign season has not been restricted to responding to these existential threats—to the contrary, it has been notable for its breadth, variety, and inventiveness.

Trump’s policies has motivated so many Muslims to enter the political arena

In July, the Associated Press had interviewed Muslim candidates about this record number. The reporting revealed that it’s precisely the bigotry and hate that has been directed toward Islam — including in remarks and tweets by United States President Donald Trump — that has motivated so many Muslims to enter the political arena, where they now stand poised to advance policies that directly reflect their faith and also benefit all of their constituents

Months earlier, Donald Trump had called for “a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States.” This blatantly discriminatory proposal was part of a larger political campaign steeped in Islamophobia.

The Muslim-Democratic alliance has only been strengthened in the wake of President Trump’s Muslim ban, which translated his xenophobic campaign promises into the law of the land.

With midterm elections coming up tomorrow, anti-Muslim sentiments are growing in the U.S., as more Muslims have become the target of increasing hostility since Trump’s election, daily sabah noticed. According to research conducted by the New America Foundation and the American Muslim Institution, two in five Americans think that Islam is not compatible.

 

Read more from Shafaqna:

Increase of anti-Islam campaigning in the US on the verge of the midterm Election

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