Muslims fear ‘awkward coincidence’ of Eid festival falling on 9/11

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SHAFAQNA – Muslim leaders in America have expressed concerns over the “awkward coincidence” that this year’s festival of Eid could fall on September 11.

There are fears the holiest day in the Islamic calendar, which sees Muslims enjoy feasts, could be misinterpreted as a celebration of the Twin Towers terror attacks and spark a backlash.

Meetings are being held at the Council on American-Islamic Relations after concerns were raised.

This week Muslim leaders will fix a date for the festival of Eid al-Adha by looking for the first sighting of the new moon.

But they are preparing for the “awkward coincidence” that the celebration could fall on Sunday, September 11.

The fears come in a climate where presidential candidate Donald Trump called for a ban on Muslim immigrants, the Times reported.

Imam Shamsi Ali, of the Jamaica Muslim Center in Queens, New York, said: “It’s generated some concern.”

“In general, I think American people are informed enough about what Islam is truly about but we are aware that there are some sensitivities now.”

Islamic leaders noted the surge in suspected hate crimes after terrorism attacks in Paris and California.

“It’s on the minds of every Muslim leader in the country right now,” said Robert McCaw, director of government affairs at the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

“We grieved like everyone else. We remember this day not because we’re Muslim, but because we’re American.”

In 2010 Eid al-Fitr, which marks the end of Ramadan, looked likely to fall on September 11.

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