Youm e Ashura in Hyderabad: 435 years old historical BiBI Ka Alam being carried on an elephant in Hyderabad

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SHAFAQNA (Shia International News Association)

The Bibi-ka-Alam is believed to contain a holy relic and the practice of installing the Alam is a 435-year-old tradition dating back to the Quli Qutb Shahi period. There is a relic enclosed in this Alam, The relic is a piece of the wooden plank on which Bibi Fatima al Zahra (SA) the only daughter of Prophet Mohamad (SAWW) was given her final ablution by her husband Imam Ali ibn Abi Talib (AS) before burial. The relic is believed to have reached Golconda all the way from Karbala in Iraq during the reign of Golconda king Abdullah Qutb Shah

History

Throughout the history of Qutub Shahi reign, the tradition of Azadari or Mourning of the Martyrdom of Imam Hussain and his followers was conducted with high regard under state supervision.

This Ashur Khana was renovated by the Seventh Nizam under the advice of Nawab Zain Yar Jung. The main entrance and its roof remain unaltered on which 1299 H, the year of construction is engraved. The room in which the Alam is installed is a strong room and the Alam is kept in a safe made on the design of a Sarcophagus (Zarih).

This Relic was in Karbala for a very long time. In the time of Abdullah Qutub Shah it reached Golkonda. The Relic was preserved in the calligraphic Alam with Arabic lettering of Allah, Mohammed and Ali. It was covered with an alloy of metals and gold. later Nasir-ud-daulah offered jewellery to the Alam which still exists.

There was a Royal decree sanctioning funds for the expenses and award of jagirs for the maintenance of the attendants. The provision for the paraphernalia of naubat, mahi maratib and the Royal Umbrella for the procession were also made. Throughout the year a wooden louvred blind is placed at the entrance Two green pouches, in the shape of ear-rings containing precious gems are suspended on either side of the Alam.

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